• When owed a debt, it is often a commercial decision as to whether to pursue the debt or write it off. By using asset tracing services you’ll be able to make an informed choice on whether it is commercially viable to pursue a debt and can decide the best course of action to take to recover the outstanding amount. We provide asset tracing and debt recovery work to clients across a range of public and private industry sectors.

    Our investigations include orders to attend court for questioning, working with tracing and enquiry agents, online desktop investigations (including Companies House, The London Gazette and the Land Registry) and investigations pursuant to the Insolvency Act 1986.

    We apply these findings to determine the course of action most likely to recover the debt. Options can include payment plans, winding up petitions, bankruptcy orders, charging orders and/or attachment of earnings orders. We understand the public law duties of our public sector clients and work with you to identify a way forward which is justifiable and will stand up to public scrutiny.

    Working with clients

    We discuss with our clients relevant commercial and public law considerations (if applicable) and any specific issues which should be taken into account when determining if a debt should be pursued and the best recovery method in the circumstances.

    We deal with all aspects of the legal process, from advising about recovery options and pre-action correspondence, to issuing proceedings through to enforcement.

    Work undertaken includes in relation to:

    • Commercial and consumer contracts
    • Invoice debt
    • High Court and County Court proceedings
    • Statutory demands & applications to set aside
    • Winding up and bankruptcy
    • Enforcement of charging orders by orders for sale
    • Freezing orders
    • Search and seizure orders

    How we support our clients

    Acting for a financial services regulator in relation to the recovery of approximately £100 million connected with a complex multi-jurisdictional corporate structure involving local and complex cross border insolvency issues; recovery proceedings to judgment (at first instance and on appeal) in a number of jurisdictions covered by the Supreme Court of the Eastern Caribbean; and the on-going involvement and management in the liquidations of corporate entities based outside the UK.

    Advising on winding up a private entity to recover non-payment of parking charges in excess of £350,000.

    Successfully agreeing payment plans with debtors to ensure monies owed to clients are successfully recovered.

    Obtaining an order to attend questioning and subsequent attachment of earnings order on behalf of a public entity to recover monies owed by an ex-employee pursuant to a County Court judgment.

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